Posted in Photo challenge, pondering, Weekly Photo Challenge

Layers of texture.

I am drawn in by moss. I love the colour; the texture and the layers. I love the contrast between the layers: rough rock and soft moss.

In this photo, there is the added bonus of a contrast in textures between new spring green and last fall’s leaves, once crisp but now soggy.

layers of moss rock and leaves.jpg

This week, share with us a layered image of your own. The topic is wide open, as long as you focus on the interplay of depth, density, and texture (or just choose one of these elements if you’d like). Strata of clouds, a shirt collar peeking through a sweater, a cross-section of an onion: you can keep your interpretation as literal or as figurative as you wish.

Posted in Nature, pondering, Weekly Photo Challenge

Soft as a .. {WP Photo Challenge: Texture}

feather soft (1)

“to be
soft
is
to be
powerful”
― Rupi Kaur, Milk and Honey

soft moss

“Poems are soft kitten furs. smoothing out the rough edges of my world.”
― Sanober Khan

WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge: Texture

Photography is a primarily visual medium, but we can experience it with more than one sense. This week, focus on the tactile element of the objects you shoot, whether it’s one distinct quality — softness, smoothness, graininess, or any other texture you find interesting — or a combination of several within one frame.

 

Posted in garden, Phonegraphy, Scope for the Imagination

Sally D’s Mobile Photography Challenge: Macro

 

sedum

I just get lost in my garden. I love the textures and colours. I adore watching journey that my plants take as the season goes on.

This year I’m trying creeping sedum for a patch where weeds barely grow. Hopefully it’s as hardy as advertised! Now I just need to add some rocks to cover the surrounding area while the sedum takes root. 🙂 I’m sure it will be a source of inspiration as it grows.

Kindly visit Lens and Pens by Sally to join in this weekly challenge.

These colorful perennials fit into many niches.

Creeping sedums, also commonly known as stonecrops, offer unending interest throughout my garden. They are among the most versatile, drought-tolerant, and easy-to-grow perennials I’ve ever cultivated during several decades as a gardener. Sedums actually decrease work for a gardener as they increase in square footage. Renowned for their ability to spread quickly, these low growers thus keep weeds from taking hold. Although it’s not necessary to deadhead the spent blooms since they eventually just fade away, it’s easy to remove old flowers with a string trimmer. As long as they’re not over-watered, they rarely suffer from any diseases or pests.

While even the poorest soil can nourish sedums—and poor or little soil is actually their preferred medium—good drainage is the key to growing them. Too much moisture, especially standing water, will do what no drought can: It will quickly kill a sedum.

Read more: http://www.finegardening.com/creeping-sedums#ixzz4BOHaGS2v
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Read more: http://www.finegardening.com/creeping-sedums#ixzz4BOHBYTPg